Powerhouse Blueprint Software

Computer Assisted Drilling

Don't just bowl with the ball that the pros use, bowl with the ball that fits your game. We are the only Hampton Roads bowling pro shop that offers a COMPLETE service that fits a bowling ball to your individual game. Blueprint is a Computer Aided Design (CAD) software that can be used to determine what bowling ball, surface, and drilling layout to use on any given lane condition based on the bowler's delivery. Using Powerhouse Blueprint we can determine if a new ball is proper for a given lane condition before the ball is even drilled.

Blueprint allows you to simulate the on-lane performance of your virtually-drilled bowling ball, taking into account the ball's as-drilled mass properties and coverstock characteristics, the oil pattern and lane surface, and the bowler's unique delivery parameters. We can use the Blueprint Software to change the layout of existing drilled bowling balls to see if a change in layout or adding a balance hole will change the bowling ball's reaction. Additional highlights from the virtual ball drilling process include: On-Lane Ball Motion Simulation
Blueprint allows you to simulate the on-lane performance of your virtually-drilled bowling ball, taking into account the ball's as-drilled mass properties and coverstock characteristics, the oil pattern and lane surface, and the bowler's unique delivery parameters.

Highlights of the on-lane ball motion simulation include: PowerHouse Blueprint is a registered trademark by Ebonite International. Screenshots and descriptions are courtesy of Powerhouse Blueprint and 3DB Technology, LLC. All rights reserved.

Balance

Effect of balance holes on motion

Balance holes are an effective way to change the motion of a bowling ball. What you are doing, by drilling a balance hole, is replacing ball material density with a lighter density material (AIR). This will change the RG, Int. Differential, and Total Differential numbers of the ball. These changes in numbers will change the motion of the ball.

Symmetrical Ball

Symmetrical Study

Asymmetrical Ball

Asymmetrical Study

Ball Motion

The 3 types of ball motion

There are 3 types of ball motion. They are Smooth, Hook and Set, and Skid/Flip. These motions are all based upon how the bowling ball responds to FRICTION. How a bowling ball responds to friction will determine its reaction. Always remember that bowling balls all respond the same way to oil, they skid. There are 3 types of responses to friction. (1.) Too Slow, (2.) Too Fast, (3.) Correctly. 2 of the 3 responses to friction are horrible with the worst one being a ball that responds too fast to friction. This response will create an Over/Under reaction.

Smooth

Smooth

Hook and Set

Hook and Set

Skid/Flip

Hook and Set

Yin Yang

You can't have one without affecting the other.

The more reaction that you create in the front part of the lane, the less reaction you will have at the back of the lane. The less reaction that you create in the front of the lane, the more reaction that you will have at the back part of the lane. Yin Yang. So, how do you change the reaction and where it starts to happen? Adjust the coverstock, or shell, of the ball with abrasives and/or polishes. The general rule is this: The rougher the cover preparation the earlier and smoother the reaction. The smoother the cover preparation the later and angular the reaction.

Click on the image below showing the Motions Paths of 3 Surfaces. You with notice that the rougher the surface of the cover the earlier the motion starts and the longer hook phase becomes, creating a smoother reaction.

Click on each one of bowling balls to watch a close up video of the bowling ball reaction with the 3 different surface preparations.

The Yin Yang of Ball Motion
(Click image to enlarge.)

Yin Yang

Motion Paths of 3 Surfaces
(Click image to enlarge.)

Motion Paths

1500 Grit Surface
(Click image to play.)

1500 Grit

1000 Grit Surface
(Click image to play.)

1000 Grit

500 Grit Surface
(Click image to play.)

500 Grit

Core Shapes

Core Shape determines ball motion.

Bowling balls have a wide variety of Core Shapes. The Core Shape is the "Engine" of the ball and the Coverstock is the "Tires". The Core has its own spin rate, separate from the bowler, and its own Perferred Spin Axis (PSA). The PSA of the core is different then the Positive Axis Point (PAP) of the bowler's release. The PSA is where the PAP is migrating towards when the Core is trying to become stable. There are some general rules that apply to Core Shapes and their effect on ball motion. Ball motion has 3 phases, Skid - Hook - Roll.

Symmetrical

Symmetrical

Asymmetrical

Asymmetrical

Asymmetrical

Asymmetrical

Symmetrical

Symmetrical

Symmetrical

Symmetrical

Symmetrical

Symmetrical

Asymmetrical

Asymmetrical

Symmetrical

Symmetrical

Symmetrical

Symmetrical